Harvey Wheeler

John Harvey Wheeler (October 17, 1918 – September 6, 2004) was an American author, political scientist, and scholar. He was best known as co-author with Eugene Burdick of Fail-Safe (1962), an early Cold War novel that depicted what could easily go wrong in an age on the verge of nuclear war. The novel was made into a movie, directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Henry Fonda, in 1964. In later years, Wheeler was a founding editor of the Journal of Social and Biological Structures, 1982, and an early advocate of online education and the Internet as a democratizing tool. He taught a course in "OnLine Publishing" for Connected Education in the mid-to-late 1980s.

Wheeler was born on October 17, 1918 in Waco, Texas. He attended Subiaco Academy, earned his bachelor's and master's degree from Indiana University, and his PhD from Harvard University. He taught at Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University; became full professor of political science at Washington and Lee University, where he wrote Fail-Safe. In 1960, he became a longtime fellow at the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions in Santa Barbara, California. While at CSDI he wrote, edited or contributed to a dozen books, including Democracy in a Revolutionary Era (1968) and The Virtual Library (1987). Wheeler was an authority on Francis Bacon (1561–1626). He died on September 6, 2004 in Carpinteria, California.

Details

Vorname:Harvey
Geburtsdatum:17.10.1918 (♎ Waage)
Geburtsort:Waco
Sterbedatum:06.09.2004
Nationalität:Vereinigte Staaten
Sprachen:Englisch;
Geschlecht:♂männlich
Berufe:Schriftsteller, Politikwissenschaftler, Redakteur, Hochschullehrer,

Merkmalsdaten

GND:N/A
LCCN:N/A
NDL:N/A
VIAF:4954379
BnF:N/A
ISNI:N/A
LCNAF:n50016728
Filmportal:N/A
IMDB:nm0923838